Hurricane Beatriz slams into Mexico; heavy rains, tornadoes hit the Midwest

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 02:34 PM GMT del 21 Giugno 2011

Share this Blog
7
+

Hurricane Beatriz plowed into the Pacific coast of Mexico near La Fortuna this morning as a Category 1 hurricane with 90 mph winds, bringing very heavy rains and mudslides to a 200-mile stretch of coast. Acapulco reported 5.20" of rain yesterday, and one injury due to a falling free. Hurricane-force winds extend outwards 25 miles from the center of Beatriz, and these winds are likely to cause moderate damage along a 200-mile stretch of the Mexican coast today as the storm moves northwestwards towards Cabo Corrientes. However, the primary threat from the storm will be heavy rain, and the expected rains of 6 - 12" are likely to cause very dangerous flooding and mudslides today and Wednesday morning. Satellite loops reveal that Beatriz weakened significantly over the past few hours, once the eye moved over land. The mountainous terrain of coastal Mexico will continue to tear up the storm today, and Beatriz will likely be a weak tropical storm by the time it moves back out to sea on Wednesday.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Hurricane Beatriz over the Pacific coast of Mexico taken at 9:30am EDT June 21, 2011. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

Tornadoes, heavy rain slam the Midwest
Severe thunderstorms rumbled through a wide section of the Midwest yesterday, generating numerous tornadoes, baseball-sized hail, and heavy flooding rains. The storm also brought heavy snow to the mountains of Colorado above 9,500 feet, an unusual occurrence for so late in June. NOAA's Storm Prediction Center logged 43 preliminary tornado reports yesterday in Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Texas, and North Dakota. The tornadoes mostly avoided populated areas, and only sporadic damage was reported. Perhaps the most significant impact of the storm was the large area of 1 - 4 inches of rain it dropped on Nebraska and South Dakota. This rain will run off into the Missouri River, further aggravating the flooding that has breached two levees and overtopped two other levees in the past week. The large, slow-moving low pressure system responsible for the rains and severe weather will bring additional heavy rains of 1 - 3 inches over portions of the Missouri River watershed today, and will touch off a new round of severe weather today and Wednesday as the storm progresses slowly eastwards. However, the Storm Prediction Center is issuing only their "Slight Risk" forecast for severe weather for both days.


Figure 2. Radar reflectivity image of a supercell thunderstorm with a classic hook echo. The storm spawned a tornado that hit Elm Creek, Nebraska yesterday. The tornado ripped the roofs off of several houses and tore down power lines.

The Atlantic is quiet
The Atlantic is quiet, with no tropical cyclones predicted over the next seven days by the reliable computer models.

Jeff Masters

Rainbow Over Mt. Sopris (enghorn)
Rainbow Over Mt. Sopris

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 659 - 609

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Blog Index

Quoting AtHomeInTX:






Gustav was pretty close to that too.


Gustav made landfall in Eastern Louisiana

Now Humberto in 2008 and Rita in 2005 hit very close to that area
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
655. Skyepony (Mod)
The worst in '04 was after Frances, I think Ivan was suppose to hit hard. Still didn't have power. Luckily it turned. Then Jeanne showed up. We were over the shock of the thought of getting smacked back to back. Jeanne was hands down the easiest storm to get ready for since we were already ready..Just needed more dried, canned food.

Member Since: Agosto 10, 2005 Posts: 156 Comments: 36065
Odd for this time of year.

Pensacola NAS, Florida (Airport)
Updated: 13 min 51 sec ago

82 °F
Overcast
Humidity: 67%
Dew Point: 70 °F
Wind: 17 mph from the NNW

Wind Gust: 32 mph
Pressure: 30.04 in (Rising)
Member Since: Agosto 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
Quoting weathermanwannabe:
Speaking of statistics related to direct hits/landfalls, does anyone know if there has ever been one season with back-to-back landfalls of a hurricane or tropical storm say within 50-100 miles of the same location?....... (not counting the Charley/Wilma one-two punch in South Florida a few years back as they "criss-crossed" some of the same parts of the State but initial landfalls were in very different locations).






Gustav was pretty close to that too.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Some droughts have plagued Texas in excess of five years

this one has only been 5 months, imagine 5 years
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Skyepony:
TX is getting rain.. Highest total so far by radar is 7.5 inches.


That's some very welcomed news.

That soaking rain is falling in some of the worst drought stricken areas in Texas:

Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting Skyepony:
TX is getting rain.. Highest total so far by radar is 7.5 inches.

:D
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Well gotta go before the kids bother me to death.I mean it is their summer break.And my local news is on.Good night everyone.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
648. Skyepony (Mod)
TX is getting rain.. Highest total so far by radar is 7.5 inches.
Member Since: Agosto 10, 2005 Posts: 156 Comments: 36065
2004 and 2005 were insane. i lived in cape coral,fl and it seemed like we had a Hurricane Watch or Warning every weekend for 3 months.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


It's quite common in the eastern Pacific. The blog just doesn't pay very much attention to the Pacific fish storms in the middle of the Atlantic season when there are true land threats, and thus we miss most of the spectacular dissipations. Adrian did it too.


I'm guessing this happens due to the expansive marine layer that encompasses most of the Eastern Pacific.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AtHomeInTX:


The rain here has been minimal but we're supposed to get another chance tomorrow. I just ran across this when trying to find out about Texas droughts. So I guess everything's normal here.

Hurricanes

One major weather condition threats Texas every year. The Texas Gulf Coast is in the line of fire of deadly hurricanes from mid-summer through fall. These monster storms come ashore with torrential rains, powerful winds and a deadly storm surge. Hurricanes come ashore in Texas about every three years, on average. As of 2011, the deadliest hurricane to hit the state was in 1900. More 8,000 people were killed on Galveston Island when the hurricane's storm surge covered the entire land surface of the island.

Drought

All of Texas is susceptible to drought. Each decade of its history has brought a period of severe drought to the state. Streams dry up, crops die and brush fires rage in this challenging weather condition. Some droughts have plagued Texas in excess of five years. Texas droughts tend to end because of the torrential rain associated with tropical storms.



Well it's been three years since you all have had a hurricane...Let's see what happens...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Thanks Folks.....Why look it up when someone on here usually knows the answer...... :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting gulfscout:


Rain has not made it's way to south texas. rain chances in houston have just decreased.


The rain here has been minimal but we're supposed to get another chance tomorrow. I just ran across this when trying to find out about Texas droughts. So I guess everything's normal here.

Hurricanes

One major weather condition threats Texas every year. The Texas Gulf Coast is in the line of fire of deadly hurricanes from mid-summer through fall. These monster storms come ashore with torrential rains, powerful winds and a deadly storm surge. Hurricanes come ashore in Texas about every three years, on average. As of 2011, the deadliest hurricane to hit the state was in 1900. More 8,000 people were killed on Galveston Island when the hurricane's storm surge covered the entire land surface of the island.

Drought

All of Texas is susceptible to drought. Each decade of its history has brought a period of severe drought to the state. Streams dry up, crops die and brush fires rage in this challenging weather condition. Some droughts have plagued Texas in excess of five years. Texas droughts tend to end because of the torrential rain associated with tropical storms.



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting caneswatch:


2004. Same town, just a couple miles apart.
It was like ading salt to injury for those people that lived down there.Just when your cleaning up and putting your life back together you see another one on the horizen..and then it stikes you..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting weathermanwannabe:
Speaking of statistics related to direct hits/landfalls, does anyone know if there has ever been one season with back-to-back landfalls of a hurricane or tropical storm say within 50-100 miles of the same location?....... (not counting the Charley/Wilma one-two punch in South Florida a few years back as they "criss-crossed" some of the same parts of the State but initial landfalls were in very different locations).
Frances and Jeanne in 2004?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weathermanwannabe:


Thanks (maybe I got my names mixed up)...I need to check the archive charts on that one....What year was that again?


2004. Same town, just a couple miles apart.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting alfabob:

There is a much smaller area aloft which drops down the west coast after the larger trough (travels much further south directly towards Beatriz), kind of imbedded in the plume of heat that dropped down with it. Either way the images are not up to date, so all I can do is XTRAP and see if it matches up with the general time of it collapsing; which it does. I'm sure it wasn't the only factor though.
what?

Could you post the image of where you are getting this and then explain what toured trying to say please?

I'm curious
Member Since: Agosto 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting weathermanwannabe:


Thanks (maybe I got my names mixed up)...I need to check the archive charts on that one....What year was that again?
2004.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
The GOM will also not cool off if these non-cloudy hot days continue.
Well that's the point I was trying to make. If the GOM has more cloudy and less intensely hot days it has got to cool off a little.Water can cool off in the summer. It will still be very favorable for development however.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weathermanwannabe:
Speaking of statistics related to direct hits/landfalls, does anyone know if there has ever been one season with back-to-back landfalls of a hurricane or tropical storm say within 50-100 miles of the same location?....... (not counting the Charley/Wilma one-two punch in South Florida a few years back as they "criss-crossed" some of the same parts of the State but initial landfalls were in very different locations).
I think Francis and Jeane [2004] had similar landfalls.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
Jeanne made landfall only 3 miles from where Frances made landfall 3 weeks before.


Thanks (maybe I got my names mixed up)...I need to check the archive charts on that one....What year was that again?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
ALREADY REMOVED SORRY COSMIC


Thanks, seriously this board is about weather not nasty cheap....
Member Since: Agosto 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 655
633. MTWX
Quoting TampaSpin:

I'm sure the people on the Texas coast would enjoy that senerio!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'am awesome.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cchsweatherman:
Gotta say, this has got to be the fastest I've seen a tropical cyclone go from hurricane to dissipation in my entire time studying weather.

Beatriz is no longer a tropical cyclone as of the latest 11 PM EST advisory from the NHC. Based upon this, it went from hurricane to dissipation in less than 15 hours.


It's quite common in the eastern Pacific. The blog just doesn't pay very much attention to the Pacific fish storms in the middle of the Atlantic season when there are true land threats, and thus we miss most of the spectacular dissipations. Adrian did it too.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
Yes!!! Frances and Jeanne.
Jeanne made landfall only 3 miles from where Frances made landfall 3 weeks before.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:






looks like something going on around Nicaragua to me?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 1344:


This is not a second year La Nina, BTW


It is because of how the winter and spring went down in La Nina conditions. Regardless of whether we are in neutral during the summer or not, the global energy budget for the year is largely defined by the ENSO state during the spring, which is usually weakening towards neutral in most years.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weathermanwannabe:
Speaking of statistics related to direct hits/landfalls, does anyone know if there has ever been one season with back-to-back landfalls of a hurricane or tropical storm say within 50-100 miles of the same location?....... (not counting the Charley/Wilma one-two punch in South Florida a few years back as they "criss-crossed" some of the same parts of the State but initial landfalls were in very different locations).
Yes!!! Frances and Jeanne.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
624. MTWX
This low is controling the weather over at least 75% of the country right now!! This thing is massive!Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 1344:


This is not a second year La Nina, BTW
Welll it went from La nina to neutreal this year.That's probally what he meant...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Speaking of statistics related to direct hits/landfalls, does anyone know if there has ever been one season with back-to-back landfalls of a hurricane or tropical storm say within 50-100 miles of the same location?....... (not counting the Charley/Wilma one-two punch in South Florida a few years back as they "criss-crossed" some of the same parts of the State but initial landfalls were in very different locations).
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


Direct Hit:
A close approach of a tropical cyclone to a particular location. For locations on the left-hand side of a tropical cyclone's track (looking in the direction of motion), a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to the cyclone's radius of maximum wind. For locations on the right-hand side of the track, a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to twice the radius of maximum wind. Compare indirect hit, strike.

Strike:
For any particular location, a hurricane strike occurs if that location passes within the hurricane's strike circle, a circle of 125 n mi diameter, centered 12.5 n mi to the right of the hurricane center (looking in the direction of motion). This circle is meant to depict the typical extent of hurricane force winds, which are approximately 75 n mi to the right of the center and 50 n mi to the left
ok......lol..........im lost, what exactly did Beatriz achieve? Strike or Direct Hit?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 1344:


This is not a second year La Nina, BTW
this season is neutral till mid sept till the heart of the season
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cchsweatherman:
Gotta say, this has got to be the fastest I've seen a tropical cyclone go from hurricane to dissipation in my entire time studying weather.

Beatriz is no longer a tropical cyclone as of the latest 11 PM EST advisory from the NHC. Based upon this, it went from hurricane to dissipation in less than 18 hours.


WOW, I have never seen something like it
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TampaSpin:
The GOM is not likely to cool at all until we either get a storm in it or until next Fall. The thing just does not cool at all this time of year.
The GOM will also not cool off if these non-cloudy hot days continue.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Gotta say, this has got to be the fastest I've seen a tropical cyclone go from hurricane to dissipation in my entire time studying weather.

Beatriz is no longer a tropical cyclone as of the latest 11 PM EST advisory from the NHC. Based upon this, it went from hurricane to dissipation in less than 15 hours.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

Remove the picture please, some people might find that offensive and degrading.
ALREADY REMOVED SORRY COSMIC
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
615. 1344
Quoting Levi32:


Most 2nd-year La Ninas have active Cape Verde seasons, though some farther west than traditional "Cape Verde" storms due to cooler SSTs. It would take a lot to get 2011 up to the level of 2010. Such active seasons just don't occur back to back.


This is not a second year La Nina, BTW
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

Remove the picture please, some people might find that offensive and degrading.


Direct Hit:
A close approach of a tropical cyclone to a particular location. For locations on the left-hand side of a tropical cyclone's track (looking in the direction of motion), a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to the cyclone's radius of maximum wind. For locations on the right-hand side of the track, a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to twice the radius of maximum wind. Compare indirect hit, strike.

Strike:
For any particular location, a hurricane strike occurs if that location passes within the hurricane's strike circle, a circle of 125 n mi diameter, centered 12.5 n mi to the right of the hurricane center (looking in the direction of motion). This circle is meant to depict the typical extent of hurricane force winds, which are approximately 75 n mi to the right of the center and 50 n mi to the left
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

Remove the picture please, some people might find that offensive and degrading.


Agreed, my first reaction was not positive in this either. Can anybody say EWWWW!
Member Since: Agosto 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 655
The GOM is not likely to cool at all until we either get a storm in it or until next Fall. The thing just does not cool at all this time of year.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
What? Beatriz is no longer a tropical cyclone?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FrankZapper:
The GOM is very warm now because of the record heat and drought. As summer normalizes, it could very well cool off a few degrees. The action this year appears to be centered in the Pacific. We will get our share, but not anything like 2005.
Noone said we were having a 2005.I'm just saying in years like these I have seen storms either quickly spin up or quickly intensify.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CosmicEvents:
That was unexpected.
I'll drink to that!
.
.

Remove the picture please, some people might find that offensive and degrading.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 659 - 609

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Blog Index

Top of Page

About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.